Inside the Artist Studio : Hirona Matsuda & Alan Jackson Part II

By Heather K. Powers, June 4, 2015

Today’s Interview is the second half of a feature with two local Charleston, SC artists. Hirona Matsuda and Alan Jackson (Architect) currently have an incredible collaborative installation called Wall Line, up at Jericho Advisors art Gallery and I met both artist at the opening of this Piccolo Sploetto exhibit. I love with the outcome of their collaboration and installation! For this interview (Part I is here) each artist provided photo’s of their home studio’s, with a special thanks to Camela Guevara for Hirona’s studio images.  These photo’s are not styled and are typical of what her working studio looks like on an average day. READ MORE

Inside the Artist Studio : Hirona Matsuda & Alan Jackson Part I

By Heather K. Powers, May 28, 2015

Today’s Artist Interview is with TWO local Charleston, SC artists Hirona Matsudaand Alan Jackson (Architect). I’m sharing these two artist together because they currently have an incredible collaborative installation called Wall Line, up at Jericho Advisors art Gallery.  I met both artist at the opening of this Piccolo Sploetto exhibit and I am in love with the outcome of their collaboration and installation.  Each artist provided photo’s of their home studio’s, with a special thanks to Camela Guevara for Hirona’s studio images.  These photo’s are not styled and are typical of what her working studio looks like on an average day. READ MORE

Hirona Matsuda and Alan Jackson skip the canvas with Wall Line 

By Vincent Harris, Charleston City Paper, May 15, 2015

Saying that there’s a new art exhibit at the Jericho Arts gallery might be a bit misleading. What collaborating artists Hirona Matsuda and Alan Jackson have actually done is transform Jericho Arts into an installation. Titled Wall Line, the exhibit from Matsuda, a found-object artist, and Jackson, an architect, combines a site-specific installation with 30 singular pieces to create an animated overlap of patterns, modeling, and draftsmanship. READ MORE

Q & A with Alan Jackson

By Kristy Bishop, Charleston Supported Art, May 2, 2014

CSA co-founder Kristy Bishop got together with spring artist, Alan Jackson, and learned so much about his drawing process and much more.  Read on to find out what tools Alan uses, how Aikido affects his work, and how he divides his time between his day job as an architect and being a full time artist (something many artists do).

KB: What is an average day like working in your studio?

AJ: I divide my time between working on architectural projects in my home office and working on drawings. I usually work on architectural projects during the day. However, if there is some busy work to do on a drawing project such as sanding downwood panels or cutting paper or laying out a drawing, I do that during the day. I usually do final drawings after supper when I am more relaxed and have the tasks of the day out of the way. READ MORE

In the Studio: Alan Jackson

By Charleston Supported Art, April 4, 2014

Spring artist, Alan Jackson invited us into his studio located in his home in Mt. Pleasant.  He creates his work in the evenings and sets certain rules and limitations for each piece that he is working on. In addition, he always completes each pen and ink drawing in one sitting.  Line by line, dot by dot, hour by hour, Alan creates his intricate work. This is pretty extraordinary seeing as how precise and meticulous his work can be. READ MORE

Under the Radar feature in Charleston Magazine

May 2011

When Alan Jackson’s hand begins to cramp he does tekubi shindo undo, an Aikido wrist-shaking exercise. Standing with his feet shoulder width apart, he sinks his weight down by settling his abdomen and relaxing his knees. “Think of shaking water off your hands, or if you touch something hot and then try to shake out the pain,” explains the longtime martial arts enthusiast. With the dizzying precision of Jackson’s pen-and-ink line drawings—complex, detailed grids that resemble ridges of tree bark or aerial views of the prairie—tekubi shindo undo must be a constant practice. READ MORE